Milford Borough Buildings Individually Listed in the National Register:

Forester’s Hall 206-216 Broad Street & Milford Post Office Building 200 Broad Street

Monumental 2 1/2-story building of masonry construction, designed by architects Hunt & Hunt (successor firm to Richard Morris Hunt).  Built for James Wallace Pinchot (1829-1908), whose son, Gifford (1865-1946), was a leading proponent of the academic study of forestry. Erected to house classroom space and an auditorium for the Yale School of Forestry. Gifford was a Yale graduate and convinced his parents to underwrite the creation of a graduate school of forestry in this building in connection with his alma mater.  Listed individually in 1983 in the National Register.  (1904; E. S. Wolfe, builder)
 
The connected corner 2 1/2-story native bluestone building with Chateauesque profile was built for community leader james Pinchot to house the Milford Post Office, designed by New York architect Calvert Vaux.  A New York Mail article of 1867 described Pinchot as “well known in mercantile and social circles of our city  …and one of our most liberal and judicious patrons of the arts.”  The studio space in this building was occupied by   artist John Ferguson Wier, whose tenancy was chronicled in the same Mail article.  (1863)

[Second] Pike County Court House 412-214 Broad Street

Three-story eclectic design in brick, incorporating round-arched fenestration of the Romanesque Revival style with the Mansard roof of the French Second Empire style and employing distinctive stylized Palladian dormers. Building is set back from the street, with a symmetrical façade having a pedimented center pavilion which extends forward toward the street. First-story fenestration is segmental-arched and second-story is round-arched, all four-over-four. Cornice with brackets and Mansard roof broken by Palladian dormers capped with keystones. A three-stage cupola is centered on the roof, with a classically-derived base, followed by an un-dormered Mansard roof, and finished with a balustrade. Built by prominent local contractor Abram D. Brown. Individually listed 1978 in the National Register. (1872-1874; George Barton, Paterson, N.J., architect)​

Hotel Fauchère 401 Broad Street

3-story Italian Villa-style resort hotel of wood frame construction, built by Louis Fauchere (1823-1893), who spent his early years associated with European hotels before emigrating to America from Switzerland in 1851. Mathews’ county history describes the hotel as “handsome and commodious …containing 24 sleeping rooms and other apartments.” The building remained in Fauchere family for more than a century, and was a popular resort, catering to prominent guests including Sarah Bernhardt, members of the Rockefeller family, etc. Listed individually in 1980 in the National Register. (1880)
 

Dr. H. E. Emerson House / Hotel Fauchere Annex 403 Broad Street

2 1/2-story eclectic residence of wood frame construction artificially sided. hipped roof with 2-story bay window on left side. Windows flat-topped. Original 1-sotry veranda extends across the façade, featuring attenuated calumniation and an delicate turned wood balustrade. Centered on the roof on the façade is a gable dormer with a round-arched sash, 18/20 lights. Designed by an unidentified Middletown, New York, architect, and built by prominent local contractor Abram D. Brown. The Hotel Fauchère, located immediately south of this house, acquired Dr. Emerson’s home in 1907 and converted it as the hotel annex. Listed individually in 1980 in the National Register. (1902)
 

Milford Historic District

The Milford Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on July 23, 1998 by the Bureau for Historic Preservation. It is located in the commercial heart of the Borough of Milford. This community is the county seat and largest municipality of Pike County.
The Historic District consists of 22 acres beginning at the northeast corner of West Harford Street and Gooseberry Alley, then east along the north carbine of West Harford Street ca. 275′ to the east curb line of Broad Street; then south along the east curb line of Broad Street ca. 150′ to the south property line of 101 East Harford Street; then east along the rear lot lines of the properties fronting on East Harford Street ca. 775′ to a point; then north ca. 325′ to the south burbling of Pear Alley; then west along the south curb line of Pear Alley ca. 525′ to the west burn line of Blackberry Alley; then north along the west burn line of Blackberry Alley ca. 1,100′ to the northeast property line of 501 Broad Street; then west ca. 450′ to the east curb line of Gooseberry Alley; then south along the east curb line of Gooseberry Alley ca. 425′ to the rear property line of 107 West Catherine Street; then west ca. 100′ to the west lot line of 109 West Catherine Street; then east along the north curb line of West Catherine Street ca. 100′ to the east curb line of Gooseberry Alley; then south along the east curb line of Gooseberry Alley ca. 775′ to the place of beginning at the north curb line of West Harford Street.

Contributing resources to the Milford Historic District:

Dimmick House – 101 East Harford Street

Large-scale, three-story Greek Revival-style corner building of brick construction, with gable roof and shallow shed dormer added onto the East Harford Street elevation in the early twentieth century. Seven-bay arrangement on the East Harford Street side, four-bay on the Broad Street side. Gable roof, with partial return of the cornice. Windows flat-topped, with some multi-light sash remaining along with exterior shutters. Two-story gallery wraps around both principal elevations. Built by Samuel Dimmick (1793-1867), an early settler of Milford, who served as county Treasurer, Commissioner, and Justice of the Peace. His family continued to run the hotel into the twentieth century, including the years between 1858 and 1879, when his daughter, Frances A. Dimmick, who was also Milford’s Assistant Postmaster, oversaw the operations. The original building (1828) was destroyed by fire and Samuel Dimmick erected the present building on its site (1856.)

103 East Harford Street

2/12-story vernacular wood frame residential building with gable roof, gable-end orientation to the street, and artificial siding. One-story hipped-roofed porch across façade has been enclosed. Windows flat-topped with replacement exterior shutters. (c. 1900)

107-109 East Harford Street

2 1/2-story commercial building with stuccoed finish on side walls and façade finished in native bluestone. Three-bay façade with main entrance offset on the left side. Storefronts have been altered with the installation of tall bulkheads. Compatible on-story bluestone addition (ca. 1960s) on left side, trimmed in native bluestone. (ca. 1900)

117 East Harford Street

2 1/2-story Gothic Revival vernacular wood frame residence, with 1-story hipped roff porch extending across façade, trimmed with sawn ornament. Three-bay façade with main entrance offset on the right side. Windows flat-topped, with original shutters mounted outside the window surrounds. In pediment of gable on façade is a pointed-arched window with corresponding exterior shutters; finial and pendant at peak of gable. (ca. 1880)

Harford-Smith House – 201 East Harford Street

The oldest house in Milford, this home was built by Philadelphian Robert Harford well before Judge Biddis laid out the community. Later owned by Dr. Francis Alexander L. Smith, whose father has a physician in the Revolutionary War and was a friend of Lafayette. Local tradition holds that Lafayette once visited in this house. For a time, the property was a tavern under the ownership of Lewis Cornelius (d. 1841), who built the Sawkill House ca. 1823 diagonally across East Harford Street to the east. 3 1/2-story residence of wood construction, with gable roff and gable-end orientation to the street. 4-bay façade with main entrance asymmetrically set on the left side. Windows generally flat-topped, 6/6 and 2/2, with original exterior operable shutters. In pediment of gable on façade is a pointed-arched window with corresponding shutters. (ca. 1740)

Harford-Smith Barn – 201 East Harford Street

Two story wood frame barn with gable roof. (ca. 1800)

204 East Harford Street

Three-story vernacular commercial building with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Set back from the street, with 2-story gallery on façade. Windows flat-topped, six-over-six; some have been altered. Sunburn Fire Insurance Maps and local history research suggest that this building was once part of the 1823 Sawkill House hotel which fronted on East Harford Street and which has been razed. (ca. 1823)

Anthony Brooks Building – 200 East Harford Street

This 2-1/2 story Greek Revival temple-form commercial building of brick construction, with partial return of the cornice on the gable ends. Three-bay façade, modified at an indeterminate date by removing portions of the walls to create a recessed drive-through for automotive traffic. Original windows are flat-topped, six-over-six lights, with exterior operable louvered shutters. One-story contemporary shed-riffed wood frame addition at right side, set back from the plane of the façade. Sanborn Fire Maps identify this building as having been a general store in 1885, a grocery in 1905, and by 1928, The Milford Steam Laundry. More recently, it was the Alvin Blitz Garage in 1940’s and 1950’s. (ca. 1850)
The Anthony Brooks Building represents an exceptional example of rehabilitation of an historic structure to serve a contemporary use. The work was painstakingly carried out to preserve the historic character of the building. It is now, and will probably always be, a valuable economic and cultural asset in our community. Paul and Debra Brooks have done an outstanding job of stewardship of this important commercial structure.

Sawkill House Stable – 207 East Fourth Street

Two story vernacular utilitarian building of wood frame construction, clad in asbestos shingle siding. Intersecting gable roof of standing-seam metal. Two overhead garage doors on façade. Fenestration features flat-topped windows, with some original six-over-six sash remaining. Sunburn Fire Insurance Maps identify this building as having been the stable associated with the Sawkill house, a resort hotel which was located diagonally behind the stable, fronting on East Harford Street and which was operated by Lewis and John Cornelius. (ca. 1830). ​This building was recently renovated.

Wallace Building / Masonic Hall – 204 East Fourth Street

Three-story Italianate commercial building of brick with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Original storefront intact, including large plate glass display windows and recessed centered entrance. Storefront cornice extends across entire storefront. Three-bay upper façade with segmental-arched fenestration and flat-topped sash, one-over-one light. Built for storekeeper John C. Wallace, for use as his general store. Later housed a pill manufactory. Local Masonic Lodge dates from 1800 and met in various locations until 1901 when it moved into this building, remaining here until 1911; in 1929 the organization returned to the Wallace Building. (1875)

Milford Water Company – 202 East Fourth Street

Modest vernacular commercial building of one story, with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Flat-topped windows,, with sash temporarily removed. Two-bay façade, with one-story rectangular bay window on left side; entrance offset on right side, featuring single four-panel door. Appears to have been constructed in two stages, with a corner board visible midway back where the original building terminated. Moved to its present site in 1875 when the Wallace Building was erected, and became the office of the newly-formed Milford Water Company which had been established in 1849. Sanford Fire Insurance Maps confirm this building as having been built as an office and as having been used as such as early as 1885. (ca. 1860)

John H. Wallace House – 120 East Harford Street

L-shaped vernacular residence of wood frame construction, artificially sided. Five-bay façade, with centered entrance shielded by triangular hood. Windows flat-topped, with some original exterior louvered shutters intact. Long-time home of merchant John C. Wallace (b. 1840) whose store building (204 Fourth Street) stands on Fourth Street behind the house. The first meeting of the Milford Borough Council took place in this house in the 1870s and Wallace became the community’s first Chief Burgess; he was also a leader in the local Presbyterian Church and was the head of the Milford Water Company, whose office building was built between Wallace’s house and his store building (1855)

116 East Harford Street

Temple-form Greek Revival home compatibly rehabilitated for office space. Portico shields the entrance on the façade. Gable roof with gable-end orientation to the street. (ca. 1860s)

Pinchot-Sum House – 110 East Harford Street

One of the district’s finest Italian Villa-style dwellings, built of wood frame construction with a symmetrical three-bay façade and a porch extending across the façade. Windows flat-topped, set singly and in groups. Truncated hipped roof, supported by paired brackets and clad in standing-seam metal, capped with a belvedere with a finial. Historic iron fence extends across the front of the lot. Built by Cyril C. D. Pinchot and first occupied by one Benjamin Sum. (ca. 1862)

Cornelius Bull Law Office Building –
​108 East Harford Street

One-story Greek Revival-style commercial building of small scale, temple-form in design with three-bay façade and centered entrance shielded by the extension of the roof. Windows flat-topped, with exterior operable shutters of wood. Build for Cornelius W. Bull (b. 1845), an early school teacher (1863-1865) who was admitted to the Bar in 1867 after reading law for two years with D. M. VanAiken. In 1871 Bull opened his own practice. The property was later occupied by his son, George Bull, and later by attorney Karl Wagner, Sr. (1879)

106 East Harford Street

2 1/2-story eclectic residence of wood frame construction with hipped roof and projecting gable-roofed wings. Projecting gable-roofed section on right side of façade features paneled eaves trimmed with Gothic Revival-style bargeboard. Modest Stick-style trim is seen in exterior vertical and horizontal trim boards. one-story shed-roofed porch extends across façade. Windows flat-topped, with operable exterior shutters. (ca. 1870s)

Pinchot Homestead / Milford Community House – 201 Broad Street

2 1/2-story Greek Revival-style residence of wood frame construction, rectangular and symmetrical in plan. Gable roof with lateral orientation to the street. Windows flat-topped, with multi-light sash. Main entrance is centered on the façade, featuring a single 6-panel door flanked by a transom and sidelights, above which is a round-arched multi-light double-hung window on the second story. 1899 modifications include Heins & LaFarge-designed 2-story pedimented Ionic porticos. Long associated with the Pinchot family, the home was built by Cyrille Constantien Desiré Pinchot (1797-1874). Cyril’s son, James, was reared here and became the father of Pennsylvania Governor Gifford Pinchot. In 1899 the local newspaper reported that James Pinchot was remodeling the house and moving it back some distance from the street; this alteration, designed by the prominent New York firm of Heins and LaFarge, is confined in historic Sansom Fire Insurance Maps. The Pinchot family offered the house to the community as a library and meeting place and since 1923 it has been owned by the Community House Association. (ca. 1855)

Normandy Cottage – 219 Broad Street

Fanciful Tudor Revival-style cottage with steeply-pitched gable roof. Built of rubble stone with half-timbering and some stucco finish. Windows flat-topped, some with multi-light sash and others with flat-topped sash with curvilinear lights. Exterior wood shutters, both louvered and of simple flush-board design. Tall chimney rises at the front right corner. A continuation of this building at the left was demolished to make way for a contemporary office building. Built on a lot formerly occupied by Pinchot family gardens, for Amos R. E. Pinchot (1873-1944), son of James W. Pinchot. (1903)

223 Broad Street

Gable-front Bungalow with gable-roof and gable dormer on façade. Recessed front porch glass-enclosed, likely when the building was converted for commercial use. Eaves trimmed with “Adirondack” style stylized brackets. (1920s)

103 East Ann Street

1 1/2-story wood frame residence with hipped roof and hipped dormer on façade. Stylized side piers of native cobblestone. (ca. 1930s)

104-108 East Ann Street

Three-story utilitarian building, vernacular in character, built of concrete block and roofed with a broad gambrel roof. Original windows flat-topped; some windows have been altered and sash replaced. Storefronts on the East Ann Street elevation. Historic Sunburn Fire Insurance maps suggest that this building was erected ca. 1912 and housed the Masonic Lodge Hall on the second floor. (ca. 1912)

305 Broad Street

Two story vernacular commercial building of wood frame construction clad in asbestos siding, with shallow hipped roof. Storefront with entrance on right side and large display window on façade, shielded by shallow pent roof. 2-bay upper façade with 3-part casement windows. (ca. 1940)

307 Broad Street

Two story ca. 1900 vernacular wood frame residential building with gable roof and lateral orientation to the street. A 1-story wrap-around hipped-roof porch extends across the façade and a portion of the right side. Covered with synthetic siding.

313-315 Broad Street

Two story brick commercial building with flat roof and parapet gable roof. Three-bay upper façade with three multi-light sash in each void. Storefront on first story. (ca. 1940)

317-319 Broad Street

Two story Italianate vernacular commercial building of brick construction with projecting bay of wood frame centered on second story of façade. Storefront altered with contemporary design. Modest cornice with simple brackets. (ca. 1890)

405-407 Broad Street

Two ca. 1900 interconnected buildings counted as a single resource. Front building is a gable-oriented vernacular residential building with a three-bay façade and two entrances shielded by pedimented hoods. Originally had 2-story gallery on façade. Offset at the left rear of this building and appended to it, is another gable-front vernacular building with a 1-story open porch supported by simple posts. Both buildings are asbestos-sided.

Terwilliger House – 409 Broad Street

Three-story French Second Empire-style wood frame resort hotel with a symmetrical façade and a veranda extending across the entire façade. Five-bay façade with centered entrance. Artificially sided. Mansard roof with shallow gable dormers and centered square tower, also with dormer Mansard roof. Built in the 1880s as the Terwilliger House, one of the many resort hotels in this resort community; named by its proprietress, Amanda Beck Terwilliger, sister of Louise Beck Frieh, who ran the Center Square House located next door. In 1950, under the ownership of Robert C. Pillips, the building was interconnected to the former Center Square House immediately to its left, becoming part of the Tom Quick Inn. (ca. 1880)

Center Square House – 411 Broad Street

Three-story French Second Empire-style wood frame hotel with symmetrical façade and one-story veranda. Belfast mansard roof with segmental-arched dormers. Square center tower with dormer Mansard roof. Artificially sided and many windows altered. Built on the site of the Union House Hotel in 1882, this was known the Center Square House, an 18-room hotel and one of the many resort hotels in this resort community. The hotel was built by George A. Frieh (1852-1899) and Alsatian who came to the United States in 1872. He arrived in Milford ca. 1882 and built the hotel described in a contemporary account as an “attractive hotel containing 18 rooms and supplied with modern improvements including steam heat and hot and cold water.” The hotel was eventually operated by his wife, Louise Beck Frieh, daughter of Ernest Beck, proprietor of the Vandermarkk House hotel and sister of Amanda Beck Terwilliger, who ran the Terwilliger House Hotel next door. In 1950, under the ownership of Robert C. Pillips, the building was interconnected to the former Terwilliger House immediately to its right, becoming part of the Tom Quick Inn. (1882)

413 Broad Street

Two-story ca. 1880 vernacular residential building of wood frame construction, artificially sided. Gable roof with eaves trimmed in delicate bargeboard. Windows flat-topped, with a variety of sash patterns, including 1/1 and 6/6.

James S. Wallace House – 501 Broad Street

Originally a 1 1/2-story, three-room house, a series of additions have resulted in this imposing Greek Revival residence of wood frame construction, set back from Broad Street and fronting the Center Square. Three-bay center pavilion with main entrance offset on the left; this pavilion is shielded by a 2-story portico supported by four square pillars. Intersecting gable roof of standing-seam metal. Windows flat-topped, with exterior operable shutters. Flanking the 3-bay section are side wings which appear to have been added at various times throughout the life of the building. Building is described in Harry Devlin’s TO GRANDFATHER’S HOUSE WE GO. Wallace (1774-1846) was a Marylander who came to Milford and became a leading merchant. One of the organizers of the Presbyterian Church in 1825, his home was a regular boarding house for itinerant preachers. He was one of the incorporators of the Milford Water Company in 1849. (1835, with additions through the 1850s)

V.I.A. Fountain

Located in the east quadrant of Center Square, the fountain was erected by the Village Improvement Association in 1911 as a community amenity. The Association was organized in 1904 “with the object of promoting by every available means the newness, order, beauty, and sanitary condition and improvement of the town.” This object consists of two principal nits: (1) a pedimented top unit with a smooth-dressed vertical face and rock-faced sides, bearing the chiseled inscription, “V.I.A. Milford 1911” on the front and (2) a concave drinking fountain projecting parallel to the top unit. (1911)

Pike County Soldiers & Sailors Memorial

Located in the east quadrant of Center Square, this is a memorial object consisting of a raised planting bed with characteristic cobblestone walls capped with polished stone slabs and reached by two stone steps. In the center of the planting bed is a cobblestone memorial capped with a bronze eagle and with a plaque bearing the inscription, “Dedicated in honor and memory of soldiers and sailors from Pike County, Pennsylvania who answered our country’s call to arms in wars of our nations.” Set into the ground immediately in front of the cobblestone assembly is a polished granite stone bearing the inscription, “Dedicated 1931 by August Kiel ‘The Marble King’ Restored 1991 Mt. Laurel Post 8612.” (1931)

[First] Pike County Court House / Pike County Jail

Georgian vernacular-style masonry building, two stories in height, built of native rubble stone with gable roof and lateral orientation to the street. Five-bay façade with centered entrance with sidelights and recessed single door. Centered on the roof is a hexagonal cupola with louvered belfry and a finial crowned with a weather vane in the form of a 6-foot, 2-inch-long trout. The original trout was carved by George Biddis, the son of the founder of the community; the present trout was carved in 1932 by Ralph Myer. Windows flat-topped, 2/2, with wood surrounds; those on the right side were modified and some enclosed, likely in 1874 when the [Second] Court House was completed and this became the Jail. Early photos show 12/12 sash with exterior operable wood shutters. Originally used for town meetings, religious assembly, etc., until local congregations erected their own houses of worship. Second-oldest Court House in Pennsylvania. (1814; Daniel Dimmick, builder)

105 West High Street

2 1/2-story American Foursquare residential building which has been converted for use as county offices. Hipped roof with hipped dormers. Front porch has been enclosed. (ca. 1920)

Dr. William B. Kenworthey House – 410 Broad Street

2 1/2-story Queen Anne-style residential building of wood frame construction with shingled corner tower on the right side capped with a conical roof. Original veranda has been replaced with a shed-roofed hood which shields the main entrance which is on the left side of the façade. Windows flat-topped, with simple surrounds. Hipped roof with gable dormer on façade. 2-story bay gable-roofed window on right side, with semi-circular lunette in pediment. Local sources suggest that this house was built by local builder Abram D. Brown, a prominent contractor who also built the [Second] Pike County Court House. Long-time home of Dr. W. B. Kenworthey (b. 1872), a Philadelphian who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1895 and after spending three years in nearby Dingman’s Ferry, came to Milord to practice. (ca. 1898)

Ebenezer Warner House – 406 Broad Street

2 1/2-story eclectic residence of wood frame construction, with hipped roof and extending gable-roofed pavilion. Original veranda was replaced ca. 1950 with triangular portico with classically-derived ornament, whose detailing suggests that they may have been salvaged from the veranda when it was removed. Three-bay façade with main entrance offset on the left. Pavilion extension on right side has one-story bay window capped with a turned balustrade. Exterior shutters, generally mounted outside the window surrounds. Gable dormer on façade, with segmental-arched window and corresponding shutters. Built for Ebenezer Warner (1819-1904), one of the area’s first scientific farmers, who, despite initial ridicule for his testing of soils prior to planting, eventually became known as the “Potato and Cabbage King.” Warner was also one of the founders of the First National Bank of Milford in 1900. His descendants occupied the home into the 1950’s. (1890-91)

Pike County Dispatch Building – 105 West Catherine Street

One- and two-story commercial building built in at least two sections. Northwest section of the building is of two stories, with the first story of native cobblestone, all of which came from on-site, and the second of wood frame clad in asbestos shingles and capped with a gable roof. Appended at a right angle to this section and set back from the street is a 1-story gable-roofed addition, also of cobblestone, with a truck loading bay. All fenestration is flat-topped, without significant detailing. (1915; Joseph G. and Andrew C. Snyder, builders)

Milford Municipal Building – 109 West Catherine Street

Two-story masonry building with dormer hipped roof and square 3-sotry campanile-like tower on front left corner. Tower was originally capped with an open metal tower for fire alarm bell; this was replaced by the shallow hipped roof which presently caps the tower. Façade is veneered in native bluestone, and includes a broad segmental-arched void which originally contained doors for fire apparatus and which has been sensitively in-filled with double-hung sash and a centered double door. Above this is a three-bay upper façade, with windows set singly and in a group of three at the center. Original main entrance was in the tower, with double door. Windows on main building are flat-topped, while those on the side walls of tower are narrow and round-arched. Has served as the municipal offices since it was constructed. Built by the same local contractor responsible for the construction of Forester’s Hall. (1899; E. S. Wolfe, builder)

Brown Building – 314-322 Broad Street

Two-and three-story Italianate-style commercial building located at a major intersection in the downtown. Built of stuccoed rubble stone with a façade of common brick trimmed with native bluestone quoins. First story of the façade is of rusticated sandstone. Right portion was built first, and includes the original cast iron storefront; upper façade contains six bays punctuated by segmental-arched voids with flat-topped wood sash, one-over-one, and capped with a wood cornice. Left side is of two stories, with similar storefront, fenestration, and cornice. Erected by Abram D. and B. C. Brown; the First National Bank of Milford opened on the first floor in 1901 and remained here until moving to Forester’s Hall in 1905. Later housed the T. Armstrong General Store, the Milford Bargain Store, and Bloomgarden’s Department Store. Third story of right side contains “Brown’s Hall,” a long-time public assembly facility which hosted countless community events. Has been sensitively rehabilitated, including commercial and office use on the first story and apartments above. (1888; A. D. Brown, builder)

Dr. Henry Everett Emerson Drug Store – 312 Broad Street

2 1/2-story Italianate vernacular commercial building of wood frame construction, artificially sided. Storefront on first story with original storefront cornice intact; above storefront on second story is a bay window. Windows flat-topped without distinctive architectural ornament. Hipped roof with dormer. Early uses include that of local physician H. E. Emerson’s Drug Store. Born in 1866, Emerson graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and from the University of New York Medical College in 1892. In the 1890s, Emerson served as the secretary to the Milford Borough Council, receiving $5.00 per month, including room rent and stationary. A 19th-century county history described him as “enjoying a large and lucrative practice and [he] has also conducted for some years the leading drug store in that little thriving city [Milford].” In 1889, the building was described in the local newspaper as being ‘new and handsome.” It was moved to this site ca. 1902 from its original location adjacent to the Hotel Fauchère. (1889)

310 Broad Street

Two-story gable-roofed vernacular-style commercial building of wood frame construction with gable-end orientation to the street. Windows flat-arched, six-over-six, some with original exterior operable wood shutters. Gable-end orientation to the street. A portion of the first store was once removed to allow vehicles to enter under the second story; this has been infilled with a T-111 finish, but the earlier configuration is still evident. Earlier uses include that of Gregory’s Garage, who occupied the building from 1928-1947. (ca. 1860)

Presbyterian Church Manse – 308 Broad Street

2 1/2-story wood frame residence with Greek Revival-style trabeated entrance centered on the façade, with transom and sidelights. Artificially sided. Gable roof with gable wall dormer centered on façade. One-story bay window on left side. One-story wood porch extends across the façade supported by wood posts trimmed with small brackets. Built on the site of the first permanent church for the local congregation. (ca. 1880)

Presbyterian Church – 300 Broad Street

Romanesque Revival-style church building with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Built of locally-produced bricks made by John C. Wallace. Fenestration is round-arched, set singly and in groups. At left front corner is a three-story tower with a recently restored belfry, clock, and weathervane. Clock and bell in tower were donated by former Milford resident William Bross, Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, at the time the tower was completed in 1887. Main entrance is centered on the façade with a 1-story projecting gabled pavilion. 1966 addition at rear serves as Christian education facility. Congregation dates from 1824; this is the second building to serve this congregation, the first having stood next door to the right., on the site of the Manse. Designed by same architect responsible for the [Second] Pike County Court House. (1874; George Barton, Paterson, N. J., architect)

First National Bank Building – 222 Broad Street

Colonial Revival-style bank building of brick construction trimmed in limestone, with a symmetrical façade including a 2-story central unit flanked by 1-story wings on each side. A large round-arched multi-light void is centered on the façade, including classically-derived broken pediment frontispiece. One-story wood frame addition on left side, without any architectural ornamentation. Bank was established in 1900 in the Brown Building at 314-322 Broad Street. (1929; remodeled, 1979)

220 Broad Street

2 1/2-story vernacular residential building of wood frame construction, with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Windows flat-arched, with exterior operable wood shutters. First story has been altered with the removal of original porch and its replacement with two stoops shielded by triangular hoods supported by plain wood posts. (ca. 1880)

Funk’s Shoe Repair – 105 West Harford Street

Modest one-story wood frame vernacular commercial building with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Building previously located across Harford Street. (ca. 1885)

107 West Harford Street

Modest two-story vernacular commercial building of wood frame construction with gable roof and gable-end orientation to the street. Two-bay upper façade with flat-topped windows, two-over-two. One-story shed0roof porch extends across the façade. Originally located on Broad Street, but moved to its present site in 1904 when the construction of Forest Hall began.